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Essay On Loneliness In Frankenstein

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In the novel Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, loneliness is a key theme. There comes a point in the novel where Dr. Frankenstein has to make a decision: to either make his creature an equal woman companion or to refuse his protégé and face the dire consequences. At this point, Frankenstein is knowledgeable that his creation is the murderer of his brother (and indirectly caused the execution of his family friend Justine). He sees just exactly the problems that his creation has caused and how much pain his family is in from suffering these losses. On the other hand, the monster offers peace and a ceasefire on Frankenstein’s family if he obtains what he most desires. This could potentially make his creature less miserably alone, which…show more content…

Would she be fine with the ridicule because she is the companion of someone else, or would she feel the rejection even harder, knowing that the only person who loves her needed her more to fill the void of acceptance from others? This could create a second creature that hates not only man, but the only thing in this world that is like it, additionally pushing the creature into an even greater rage, fueled by rejection, than before. An alternative path could also be that the creature dismisses what he promised Frankenstein once he sees himself in a powerful relationship with another. As Frankenstein states, “you will have companion to aid you in the task of destruction" which could just continue Frankenstein’s guilt (130). Furthermore, if indeed the two beings had the ability to procreate it would not properly know how to raise children, as it has had no example of a true father in its life. The creature would not know what to do for its children, and they may turn out the same way that their father did; filled with hatred and bitter feelings toward humans.
It can be argued that Frankenstein’s creature deserves a mate because the creature showed kindness and compassion before it was shunned by Frankenstein and society. Driven by loneliness, the creature seeks a companion so as to finally feel accepted which would supposedly stop his hatred towards society and impulses of

Frankenstein: Abandonment, Loneliness, And Rejection Essay

"We are unfashioned creatures, but half made up, if one wiser, better, dearer than ourselves-such a friend ought to be-do not lend his aid to perfectionate our weak and faulty natures,” writes the narrator of Mary Shelley’s novel, Frankenstein, Dr. Frankenstein. Without a companion of some sort, people will only suffer more. However, without the supervision of parents, children altogether are greatly affected for the rest of their lives. An innately good and sympathetic creature, Dr. Frankenstein’s monster struggles to survive in the human world. After creating and abandoning his creature, Dr. Frankenstein is the juxtaposition of a monster, portraying humans as shallow, judgmental, and uncaring. The monster simply wants humans to accept him as one of their own. Facing rejection in different forms, he becomes truly monstrous and evil, giving up hope of companionship as a result of his abandonment. Modern case studies of abandoned children report similar ideas. Children who are abandoned do not learn about morality, yet only people with morality are accepted by others as human. Children who are abandoned are frequently not accepted by others as human ultimately.
Previously unnoted, abandonment and the resulting loneliness in children have lasting impacts on adult life. As abandonment becomes increasingly more common, studies place emphasis on such impacts. Dr. Frankenstein’s monster is essentially a newborn baby when created. Caregivers teach infants to seek comfort, support, and protection (Nelson, Fox, and Zeanah). Without a caregiver to give infants that attention, incomplete and aberrant relationships are formed (Nelson, Fox, and Zeanah). Dr. Frankenstein runs when he gives his monster life, leaving his monster to survive without any parental supervision. As a result, the monster is incapable of forming relationships or connections. During sensitive periods, occurring throughout infancy, neural connections form in response to environmental influences (Nelson, Fox, and Zeanah). However, the environmental influences that the monster experiences were harsh and not meant for a misshapen creature. Psychological and behavioral problems are inherited through the surrounding world (Hurley). A child may have a predisposition for a behavioral issue, but the surrounding world has the greatest effect on the behavioral issue. For example, genes may predispose children toward loneliness, but 52% of loneliness factors come from the outside world (Shulevitz). Loneliness is mostly the feeling of rejection that makes people moody, self-doubting, angry, pessimistic, shy, and hypersensitive to criticism (Shulevitz). The monster has those not favorable traits, as seen when he tells Dr. Frankenstein about the DeLacey family. Abandonment affects children from an early age, leading to loneliness, yet another negative effect.
Institutionalized children who were abandoned by their family and unwanted by adopting families suffer the most. By the age of four and a...

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