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How to reference a Website using the Chicago Manual of Style

The most basic entry for a website consists of the author name(s), page title, website title, web address, and date accessed.

Last Name, First Name. “Page Title.” Website Title. Web Address (retrieved Date Accessed).

Smith, John. “Obama inaugurated as President.” CNN.com. http://www.cnn.com/POLITICS/01/21/obama_inaugurated/index.html (accessed February 1, 2009).

The first author’s name should be reversed, with a comma being placed after the last name and a period after the first name (or any middle name). Titles and affiliations associated with the author should be omitted. A suffix, such as a roman numeral or Jr./Sr., should appear after the author’s given name, preceded by a comma.

For a page with two or more authors, list them in the order as they appear on the website. Only the first author’s name should be reversed, while the others are written in normal order. Separate author names by a comma.

Smith, John, and Jane Doe. “Obama inaugurated as President.” CNN.com. http://www.cnn.com/POLITICS/01/21/obama_inaugurated/index.html (accessed February 1, 2009).

If no author is available, begin the citation with the website owner.

Cable News Network. “Obama inaugurated as President.” CNN.com. http://www.cnn.com/POLITICS/01/21/obama_inaugurated/index.html (accessed February 1, 2009).

The full page title, which is followed by a period, should be placed within quotation marks. Place the period within the quotation marks. Then include the website title, followed by a period. If the website title is not available, include the website owner in its place.

Smith, John. “Obama inaugurated as President.” Cable News Network. http://www.cnn.com/POLITICS/01/21/obama_inaugurated/index.html (accessed February 1, 2009).

Include the web address of the page. Next, place the text “accessed” and the date on which you accessed the website (written in the format of “month day, year”) in parentheses. Conclude the citation with a period after the parentheses.

For informal websites (such as home page or fan websites) or websites without formal titles, use descriptive phrases in your citation in place of page or website titles.

If the website has a print counterpart, such as the website for a newspaper, place the website title in italics.

Smith, John. “Catalonia Declares Independence from Spain.” New York Times. http://www.newyorktimes.com/POLITICS/11/21/catalonia_spain.html (accessed February 1, 2017).

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MLA style is published by the Modern Language Association. It is commonly used in humanities and English courses.

Generally, MLA 7 citations follow the following format:

Structure:

Contributor. Title. Secondary Contributors. Publication Information. Medium.

Contributor Information and Titles

The main contributors to the source, normally the author, are placed before the title. If there is more than one author, then arrange the authors in the same order found in the source. Reverse only the name of the first author, and follow the rest in normal form.

One author:

Smith, John K. Title.

Two authors:

Smith, John K., and Tim Sampson. Title.

Three authors:

Smith, John K., Tim Sampson, and Alex J. Hubbard. Title.

Four or more authors:

Smith, John K., et al. Title.

Sometimes the main contributor is not an author, but another contributor type, such as an editor for a book or conductor for a musical piece. In this instance, follow the contributor by an abbreviation of the contributor type (i.e. ed. or cond.). If plural, then change the abbreviation accordingly.

One editor:

Smith, John K., ed. Title.

Two editors:

Smith, John K., and Tim Sampson, eds. Title.

One conductor:

Smith, John K., cond. Title.

Many sources have secondary contributors – individuals who added to the work outside the main contributors. This can include editors and translators for books and producers and screenplay writers for movies. Place secondary contributors after the title. Precede the name of the contributors with the abbreviation for the contributor type. For instance, “Ed.” means “Edited by.”

One editor:

Smith, John. Title. Ed. Bill McCoy.

Two editors:

Smith, John. Title. Ed. Bill McCoy and Tim Thomas.

One conductor and three producers:

Smith, John. Title. Cond. Bill McCoy. Prod. Tim Thomas, Jane Horton, and Rex Bryant.

You may decide to emphasize the work, for example, when citing a live performance. In this instance, place all the contributors after the title. Authors and writers are preceded by the word “By.”

One author and editor:

Title. By John Smith. Ed. Bill McCoy.

Some sources may have corporate or group authors. Write these organization where you would write the authors. If they are also publishers of the source, include it in the publication information as well.

Corporate author:

Modern Language Association. Title.

Government author:

Illinois Dept. of Industrial Relations. Title.

Some sources are found within other sources, such as a chapter in a book, or an article in a periodical. These rules apply both to the contributors of the chapter and book, or to the article.

Chapter author and editor and two book compilers:

Smith, John. “Chapter.” Ed. Bill McCoy. Title. Comp. Russell Engels and Steve Simpson.

Author and translator of an article:

Smith, John. “Chapter.” Trans. Bill McCoy. Periodical Title.

 


Title Rules

Generally, capitalize all principal words as well as the first word and last word in the title. If citing a title for an entire source, such as a book or periodical title, place in italics. If citing an article, essay, poem or short story within a larger work, place in quotes. If a novel or published independently, then place in italics.

 


Publication Information

After the title and contributor information comes the publication information. In MLA7, you must also list the publication medium (Print, Web) after the publication information. MLA 7 abbreviates all months except for May, June and July. Below are different publication information templates.

Book:

Last, First M. Title. City: Publisher, Year Published. Medium.

Journal:

Last, First M. “Article.” Title Series Volume.Issue (Year Published): Page(s). Medium.

Magazine:

Last, First M. “Article.” Title Date Month Year Published: Page(s). Medium.

Newspaper:

Last, First M. “Article.” Title [City] Date Month Year Published, Edition, Section: Page(s). Medium.

If you cannot find all publication information, use placeholders “N.p., n.p., n.d.” which represents no place, no publisher, and no date. If there are no page numbers use “N.pag.” Capitalize the abbreviations appropriately based on where they are placed.

*Note: We format according to MLA7, we believe adding such placeholders is unnecessary, as it provides no information, and the lack of information can be assumed by its absence in the citation.

 


Additional information

For less conventional source types, you can add descriptions about the source after the title. For example, you can add “Cartoon.” or “Map.” after the title of a cartoon or map to clarify to the reader what type of source you are citing.

When citing non-periodical sources, advanced information such as the edition and section come before the publication information. Series information comes after the medium description.

See the fictional example below:

Smith, John. Power. Ed. Tom Riley. 5th ed. Vol 12. New York: Random, 2002. Print. Ser. 50.